Reflection on ‘Fairy Tales in Comics’ Seminar

PENTAX Image

Free Google Advanced image – Dale Chihuly – glass in boat – morning – Palm House

I had a profound sense of my topic’s timelessness while presenting this seminar.  Given that fairy-tale adaptations in the form of comics are part of a folklore process that has churned and persisted for thousands of years, I was excited to share my interest and findings with my classmates.  I felt humbled and honored to be part of a larger process.

It was a pleasure to receive positive feedback about ‘setting the mood’ for the seminar with a photo of a Dale Chihuly glass creation.  Libraries serve and operate within multi-faceted communities, and works of art speak well to the importance of including multidisciplinary components in our services. For a comprehensive source about Dale Chihuly and his work, visit http://www.chihuly.com – the Timeline (http://www.chihuly.com/learn#timeline), in particular, is mesmerizing!

Presenting my seminar within a class on superhero comics was serendipitous in a way, as it made me think about Ranganathan’s library-science laws, especially the third law (“Every book its reader”) and the fifth law (“The library is a growing organism”) [Rubin, 2010, pp. 407-410].  Since there are many comics styles with which both fairy tales and superhero stories can be told, adding such comics to our library collections can add a wealth of literature choices for our patrons.

Not presented in the seminar, and possibly a topic to include in a seminar on censorship, is an idea that I came across in Linda Hutcheon’s theory of adaptation (2013).  Hutcheon comments  that “Adults . . . ‘censor’ adaptations, deciding that some are appropriate for children and others are not” (p. 118).  Our responsibilities as librarians behoove us to consider and to discuss this.  Views and information on child development, morals, and ethics should be part of such a discussion.

An aspect of my presentation that didn’t fit was my plan to share resources with my classmates via the PowerPoint slides.  I had thought that this would be efficient (I am an avid note-taker), but realize that a different format may better serve my classmates.  My recommendations are, therefore, listed here:

VISUAL LITERACY

The Visual Literacy Toolbox: Learning to Read Images       http://www.humanities.umd.edu/vislit

ALMOST EVERYTHING FAIRY TALES

SurLaLune Fairy Tales     http://www.surlalunefairytales.com

HISTORY OF FAIRY TALES

Once Upon a Time: A Short History of Fairy Tales  (Marina Warner, Oxford University Press, 2014)

LITERARY FAIRY TALES

Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts      http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html

A GRAPHIC CANON

The Graphic Canon of Children’s Literature  (Russ Kick [Ed.], Seven Stories Press, 2014)

AUTHORS/SCHOLARS TO READ

Linda Hutcheon, Bill Willingham, Jane Yolen, Jack Zipes

EXAMPLE OF A FAIRY TALES COMICS SERIES FOR ADULTS

Willingham, B. (2012). Fables: Volume 1, Legends in exile. New York (NY): DC Comics.

EXAMPLE OF A FAIRY TALES COMICS COLLECTION FOR CHILDREN

Duffy, C. (Ed.). (2013). Fairy tale comics: Classic tales told by extraordinary cartoonists. New York (NY): First Second.

References

Hutcheon, L. (2012). A theory of adaptation (2nd ed.).  London, UK: Routledge.

Rubin, R. E. (Ed.). (2010). Foundations of library and information science, 3rd ed. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman.

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